What is the Best Exercise Following A Stent

SBest Exercise Following A Stento what is the best exercise following a stent?

Answering the question what is the best exercise following a stent  really depends on you and what you did physically before your stent. Prior to my stent I trained regularly about five times per week.  After my stent I was back in the gym within a week. I’m certain that being physically fit prior to my stent helped tremendously in my recovery.  That’s me though, everyone is not the same and as I said above the best type of training following a stent depends on you!

So why is exercise important after a stent?

The general consensus in the medical world is that exercise is good for hearts including hearts that have been stented or had other procedures such as by-pass surgery.

Your heart is a muscle (a very special muscle but nevertheless a muscle). The average heart beats 72 times per minute.  Below is a calculation showing how many times the average heart beats in an average 52 year life time:

in 1 min = 72
in 1 hour = 72 * 60 = 4320
in 1 day = 72 * 60 *24 = 103680
in 1 year = 72 * 60 * 24 * 365 = 37843200
in Avg life span = 72 * 60 * 24 * 365 * 52 = 1967846400

As you can see, the heart is an amazing piece of engineering a muscular pump like no other pump, and like all muscles it needs exercise to keep it strong.  You only get one heart and you need to look after it.

The level of exercise you should do depends on how conditioned you and your heart are.   If you have never exercised it would not be a good idea to do extreme training (especially following a stent).

What level of exercise?

Fitness levels vary, I know people who have had stents but who have not done any exercise for years.  Exercise for them needs to be light but regular to start with. Walking is a great way to start exercising again and this can be done only a few days after your stent placement providing you feel up to it.  Most people are unsure of what exactly to do following a stent.  Depending on where you live there may be cardiac rehabilitation clinics, check them out it will be well worth it.  They will advise you on a structured exercise programme to assist your recovery but will also monitor you progress and support you through your recovery phase.  If you do not have a facility such as this, speak to your Cardiologist or doctor for advice and support.  As a rule any form of exercise done regularly is good, walking is great, swimming is great. I found riding a bike and using a cross trainer in the gym worked for me because I was able to control the level of resistance.

The golden rule when starting to exercise is to listen to your body, take it slow and don’t rush it.  It took years for the artery to be come narrowed in the first place, you don’t want to mess things up now by doing too much too soon.

So what if you were fit and active before your stent? 

Same as above, you still have to listen to your body and take it easy. Your aim is to get back you your normal routine as soon as possible.  There is no time scale on this some people will do it quickly some will take longer.  It really depends on what you have had done to your heart, if you are having a stent post heart attack, have had multiple stent placements or have a lack of energy or feel lethargic you progress will be slower.

Establishing an exercise routine is vital to you future recovery.  The key if there is one is finding an activity that you are passionate about.  If you can do this, before you know it you will be in the habit of exercising and will probably keep it up for the rest of your life.  Taking action is the vital first step to your success and ultimately to remaining healthy in the future.

Are there any precautions I should take?

After you have a stent placement, you are normally prescribed anti-clotting medications for a period to avoid life-threatening blood clots. Any injury received during exercise can be dangerous when you are on this type of medication, so as we have said above you should discuss appropriate physical activity with your rehab specialist, cardiologist or doctor.  It is recommended that you avoid vigorous exercise and heavy lifting for a short time after a stent procedure and stop exercising immediately if you feel any pain or discomfort in you chest. Your cardiologist can tell you when physical activity is safe.

What will exercise do for you? 

I’ve said a lot about exercising following a stent but what will exercise actually do for you?  What will you get out of all this huffing and puffing and sweating?  Exercise is not just good for your heart it is also good for you as a whole.  Here are a few of the benefits you can get from regular exercise:

  • It helps to reduce stress
  • It helps with Joint lubrication and increased range of motion for those of us with arthritis
  • It helps rebuild bone for those of us with osteoporosis
  • It helps to strengthen abdominal muscles for those of us with lower back pain weakness
  • It helps to relieve constipation
  • It  boosts your immune system
  • It improves sleep
  • It helps to keep blood pressure under control
  • It helps in lowering cholesterol and triglycerides and can help prevent artery clogging and damage

For anyone who has undergone stent placement, exercise is an essential part of the long term recovery of your heart. Ignore it at your peril. Knowing What is the Best Exercise Following A Stent is can make all the difference to you and your future well-being.

46 thoughts on “What is the Best Exercise Following A Stent

  • 01/17/2014 at 15:51
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    hi,
    I had an stent one and half year back. Now all is normal. my question: I play tennis ,do yoga and jogging. Is intense exercise bad for the stent? I mean can it be dislodged with all the jumping and strong breathing?

    thanks

    Reply
    • 01/17/2014 at 17:51
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      If you were exercising before the stent there is no reason you cannot get back to a similar level of fitness. Obviously you have to build things up slowly and listen to you your body but if you keep away from the really extreme stuff you should be okay. I had mine in 2010 and I returned back to training within a few weeks and been hitting the gym four of five times per week ever since. Glad to see your made a full recovery.

      Reply
  • 01/07/2015 at 13:14
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    Hi

    Your blog is very informative. I had a stent procedure 6 months ago. I do walking for about 30-40 minutes a day and that’s it. I am keen to do some more cardiac and weight reduction exercises. Can I do abdominal crunches now that I had a stent procedure?

    Regards

    Reply
    • 02/08/2015 at 16:28
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      Hi,

      It’s great that you are out and exercising, walking is great. The only rule to go by is to listen to your body. I was back in the gym a week after my Stent and back to almost normal activity after a month but all through my recovery period I listened to what my body said and never over did it. There’s no problem with you increasing your heart rate, doing weights and abdominal exercises etc. However if you do and you start to feel anything it’s important that you stop immediately. If it persists you need to go see your doctor. Have a read of this post I did on exercising following a stent http://stentblog.net/what-is-the-best-exercise-following-a-stent it may help you. Hope everything goes well for you let me know how you get on.

      Best wishes

      Dave

      Reply
  • 01/15/2015 at 10:50
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    2 years ago I had a stent, what kind of exercise can I do indoors

    Reply
    • 02/08/2015 at 16:20
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      Hi Hazel,
      If you’ve e not done anything for a couple of year’s best start slow, I did this post following my Stent which you may find helpful http://stentblog.net/what-is-the-best-exercise-following-a-stent. Most of the exercises you can do in a gym can be done in the home given a little thought. For instance you can run on the spot or skip, or walk up and down stairs instead of walking outside. There are thousands of floor type exercises like sit ups, crunches press-ups dips between two chairs the list goes on. It all depends on your level of fitness now and what you think you can manage. Read the article and try to be a little creative and you can create a great home work out. There’s no doubt about it exercise is a must for anyone who has had a Stent, especially if you want to avoid another, Good luck with the exercise hope it works out well for you.

      Dave

      Reply
  • 05/23/2015 at 22:26
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    I lifted weights 5 days a week before I had my stent. I feel fine but have lost a lot of my body strength. I want my life back. Can I start lifting weights again, slowly and then more challenging?

    I have many physical ting I want to do again, backpacking. kyaking, etc. etc.

    Reply
    • 05/24/2015 at 11:51
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      Hi Scot,

      As I have said before this is all about how you feel and listening to your body as you exercise. There is no problem starting weights again however just be a bit clever about it. Not sure how much weight you were moving but it wouldn’t be smart to jump straight back in with massive weights it would be much better to start with a weight which you find comfortable and build it up over a number of months. If at any time you start to feel anything untoward the advice is always to stop.

      As far at the backpacking, kayaking, etc. etc. it exactly the same start off with something you’re comfortable with and build it up over time. If you’re a bit nervous about backpacking or Kayaking on your own go with a friend or a group and bring a mobile phone with you for a little more reassurance,

      The absolute best thing you can do for your heart in the long term is to exercise. After all your heart is a muscle (a very special muscle) and like all other muscles it need to work to stay strong. As long as you’re sensible in the beginning you should get back to somewhere like your pre-stent training regime over time.

      Good luck for the future Scot hope everything works out well for you. Let me know how it goes for you its always inice to see how people get on.

      Reply
  • 09/04/2015 at 09:56
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    Hi,

    My mother in law got a stent in 2008, she’s not a very active person and has never been. For about a year now she has started going for walks (morning and eve) for about 20-25 mins each. But her lifestyle otherwise is very sedentary. She isn’t losing weight, infact has gained quite a bit in the past year. I just wanted to know if it’s ok to introduce her to some more physical activity than just walking, maybe yoga. Please help

    Thanks

    Reply
    • 02/10/2016 at 16:11
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      Hi sorry for not getting back had a problem with a plugin stopping comments showing. The simple answer is most definitely. Anything which gets your mother in law more active is great. Yoga is an excellent place to start. As long as you mother in law does note expereience andy difficulties most activities will be fine. If you have any doubts its always a good idea to pop along to you doctors and discuss the best way to move forward.

      Reply
  • 11/03/2015 at 17:59
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    Hi
    Me really finding these info and reviews helpfull.
    I am 34 yrs old and had stent placement in april 2015 i use to do heavy weights before my heart attack my doc say due to genetic reason this happend, no cholesterol problem also . i started working out 2 months bck. I do brist walk and running simultaneously for 30 min on treadmill and further continue with light weight training 1 to 1.30 hrs a day and 6 days a week…I want to ask if i do abs training will it effect my heart or stent….

    Thanks and regards

    Reply
    • 02/10/2016 at 16:17
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      Hi sorry for not getting back had a problem with a plugin stopping comments showing. Your doing great with you training schedule keep it up if you can. It will pay dividends in the future I’m sure. I cant see any reason why you cant d bring ab workouts in to your training schedule. aslon as your not doing them for hours on end it should be fine. As always though if you feel anything is not quite right stop what you are doing and get things checked. Good luck for the future and keep up that training schedule.

      Reply
  • 01/20/2016 at 16:39
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    I am three months out from a heart attack and stents. I was riding 160-180 miles a week on my bike at fairly good paces prior to my heart attack. After the heart attack I felt like I lost my life when the doctor told me I couldn’t ride for a very long time.
    I went to cardiac rehab for 10 weeks after my heart attack and have been walking daily since then.
    I think it’s time for me to start getting back on the bike now.
    My question is this … the cardiac care nurses at rehab had me keeping my pulse rate at 101 or below.. for me this is extremely difficult. Should I worry so much about my pulse rate .. or more about how I feel exercising ?
    Any help you could provide would be extremely helpful.

    Reply
    • 02/10/2016 at 16:48
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      Hi Deborah, sorry for not getting back had a problem with a plugin stopping comments showing. This can be a tricky one because everyone is different. My resting heart rate was pretty slow before my stent 46-50 bmp following the stent I went on to a standard course of medication which included beta blockers. This brought my resting heart rate down to38-40. I found that if I got up suddenly say from a chair I would get dizzy. Now I knew this was the beta blockers and went to see my GP who was reluctant to take me off them and referred me back to my cardiac consultant. After my obs were taken which showed my HR and BP were low he took me off the medication.
      The reason am stating this is that the vast majority of people will be fine with the beta blocker and in many they will help but for some like me they gave me problem. Your recovery is personal as we are all different. You were very fit before your episode the level of fitness you attain now will be determined by the amount of damage done to your heart during the heart attack and the only way to find this out is by testing yourself. Now the aftermath of a major medical situation like this will shake anyone’s confidence but doing no exercise will be as bad as going flat out. A good balance is what’s needed and to strike this balance you need to ask questions both of yourself and the health care professionals who take care of you. Be honest with yourself and see how you really feel about going back on the bike if you think it will be a little scary make sure you go on a short ride and someone is with you or even better go to a gym again with a friend and use one of their indoor bikes to reacclimatize. Speak to the rehab nurse and tell her what you are thinking and ask here why your heart rate needs to be at or below 101 bpm there may be a perfectly good reason. So really it’s all about setting it up to win by ensuring that any exercise you do is well thought through, you speak to your rehab nurse maybe your doctor to ask any advice. If you haven’t already got a heart rate monitor get one so you can see what effect exercise is having on you. Set yourself a goal but start slow as you have done in you 10-week rehab phase and build the amount and intensity of your exercise up slowly. The most important thing is to listen to your body, if it feels wrong it probably is. Don’t be scared to slow down or stop If necessary and keep asking questions. Good luck with your recovery hope your back on that bike soon putting some miles in. Let me know how you get on…

      Reply
  • 03/04/2016 at 22:06
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    I had 5 stents in 3 days ago,I walked a lot before this,am a bit nervous about walking vexed using again.I’ve had 2 ,5minute walks this evening&felt good afterward ,if still a little breathless,I thought all breathlessness disappeared after stenting straight away,thanks for the info

    Reply
  • 03/25/2016 at 23:12
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    Hello Sir,
    On august4,2015 i went through the stent fitting procedure.Its more than 7months now.I have no problem,but sometimes I feel panicked.It appears to be unrest.And recently i was going home when i have to lift some weight of 10-15 kg for 10 minutes,but with intervals and slowly.I am worried,will it mark a negative impact on heart.
    Please guide

    Reply
  • 03/30/2016 at 11:37
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    hello im 36 and had a heart attack a week ago with one stent and not much damage to the heart I’m in good shape but have hereditery hight cholesterol that i have been ignoring for years.. , prior to the attack i have been training 6 days a week in a martial art called brazilian jui jitsu ( similar to judo ) its been a huge part of my life for the last 8 years. obviously i don’t want to rush anything but is it possible to train with the blood thinning drugs??

    Reply
    • 11/10/2016 at 00:33
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      What were your cholesterol numbers out of interest?

      Reply
    • 04/10/2016 at 10:58
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      Is it safe to use a inversion table that tips you upside down when you have a stent ?

      Reply
  • 05/31/2016 at 08:24
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    I am 54 year male. Diabetic. Had 3 stents 6onths ago. Waling 1 hour a dat for the last 5 months and feels fine. But find it tiring ro wash the car or iroining. Does excersice invlvibg handa will help me?

    Reply
    • 11/04/2016 at 00:41
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      I am 66 years old,3 stents were placed to remove my 3 Bloks,during April 2014,earlier i was doing yoga irregular at yoga classes, now can I do yoga daily with Adams such as sirsasn,sarvangasan,pavan mukthasan and 100 times skipping in the morning

      Reply
  • 05/31/2016 at 08:34
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    I am 54 year male. Diabetic. Had 3 stents 6onths ago. Walking 1 hour a day for the last 5 months and feels fine. But find it tiring ro wash the car or iroining. Does excersice involving hands will help me?

    Reply
  • 11/05/2016 at 09:11
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    i had heart attack and went for angio for one stent fixed. it now 8th month completed. can i do suryanaskar in yoga.
    what kind of yoga i can do. i am taking all anti cloting medicine. is there any risk of other heart attck in future.

    Reply
  • 11/08/2016 at 16:05
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    Great post, Admin.
    Good advice!
    As an athlete with a stent (AAA-stent), Bob Scott is one of my heroes. He beat me in the Maryland Half-Ironman when he was 81, 82 and 84, saying, “Hi Kev”, as he went by on the run. No ego, great athlete, heart stent 20 odd years before. As you say, we are all different, and it depends what you did before your stent.
    I recommend endurance, wisely paced, avoiding intensity as best one can.
    Cheers,
    kev

    Reply
  • 12/27/2016 at 22:56
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    I just had 4 stents put in 2 weeks ago 3 on one blockage and 1 on another I’m tolled my heart is weak as it was blocked for about a decade before it was discovered after having a heart attack 10 months ago . I am nervous about exercise. I have been walking about 20 mins a day but feel I can do more what do you think would be safe. Before this was discovered I was in construction so I got 10 to 12 hours a day regular varied exercise just working. i want to get back to a regular routine but not sure how to accomplish it.

    Reply
    • 04/16/2017 at 13:16
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      Hi Wendy,
      Sorry for not getting back sooner had a bit of a glitch with the blogs notifications coming through.

      It sounds like you have significant damage there so I would say go very slowly with any form of exercises. It’s understandable that you would be nervous about exercise but the fact that you are doing 20 min walking is great.

      When something like this happens, it can really rock you and of course, your mind will be working overtime trying to convince you that things are a lot worse than they really are. My advice is to not rush your recovery. We are all unique and all respond to illness and injury in very different ways.
      It’s vital that you listen to your body when doing any form of exercise if there’s a problem it will usually let you know.

      If you’re not happy with 20 min exercise try to increase it slowly over time and see how you heart reacts. Also think about trying different types of exercise. I like doing yoga, swimming riding a bike and all sorts of stuff. Why not give something new a try. The golden rule here is that before you start anything new speak to your doctor and see what he/she thinks. If you do decide to do say a Yoga class or swim session for instance speak to the people running the class confidentially and explain that you are recovering from a cardiac episode so that they are fully aware of your situation.
      Unfortunately, the damage has been done and it’s now about adjusting your life style accordingly so that you can live long and stay healthy in the future.

      Good luck with your recovery so sorry for not getting back sooner.

      Reply
  • 01/18/2017 at 16:08
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    Hi I had a one stent 18 months ago can I do skiping and running exercises and weight liftings

    Reply
    • 04/16/2017 at 13:30
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      Hi Manjunath,
      Sorry for not getting back sooner had a bit of a glitch with the blogs notifications coming through.

      If you have not had any cardiac episodes in the past 18 months and are not feeling any cardiac related effects then I can see no reason why can’t start to exercise. However, if you have not done anything in that time I would advise you to do 2 things.
      One, go see your doctor and explain what you are doing. He may want to do some basic checks before you start.

      Two, start exercising slowly and try to create a routine that you can stick to. Start off with something very simple and then over a period of time try to increase the regularity and intensity of training. As your strength, stamina and confidence build so will the amount of exercise you can do.

      Always listen to your body if you start feeling any pain, feeling faint or having any other adverse symptoms stop training straight away and consul your doctor. If you feel any chest pain while training call for an emergency ambulance.

      Good luck with your training hope this helped

      Sorry once again for not getting back to you sooner.

      Reply
  • 03/25/2017 at 13:23
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    I recently Had my 3rd heart Cath and had 3 more stents put in. That makes 9 total. Before my latest situation I was walking on the treadmill fire 55 minutes. It’s been one week since the procedure. How long before I can go back to the treadmill? Looking at 30 minutes now.

    Reply
    • 04/16/2017 at 13:44
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      Hi David,
      Sorry for not getting back sooner had a bit of a glitch with the blogs notifications coming through.

      Hope your recovery is going according to plan. From what you have said there is significant damage to your heart so you it would be prudent I think take things very slowly. I wouldn’t set myself amounts of time or distances to achieve for the time being.

      I would concentrate on seeing what can be comfortably accomplished. The important thing here is comfortably accomplished as it is important to ensure that you’re not putting your heart under any undue stress. In addition to this I would speak to your doctor and see if you could find someone specialising in Cardiac Rehabilitation in your area and do a few sessions with them. They will be able to explain some of the difficulties you may face and provide you with advice on the amount of exercise that is appropriate for your situation.

      Hope this helps and hope you are progressing well.

      Sorry once again for not getting back sooner.

      Reply
  • 04/15/2017 at 11:30
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    Hi, Im 53 years of age, I used to train 6 days a week in the gym, heavy training, also golf , walking etc , I had a heart attack 3 months ago and 5 stents, I have angina to, walking every day , still getting a few throat pains , would I be able to ever get back to heavy training ?

    Reply
    • 04/16/2017 at 12:52
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      Hi Peter
      Glad to see you’re on the road to recovery. The fact that you are walking every day and keeping mobile is fantastic. Well done.

      As I always say, everyone is different and everyone’s personal condition/situation is unique to them. It very important that you take this on board and try to forge an exercise programme that is right for you. From what you have said there is clearly damage to your heart having undergone a heart attack the stents and currently presenting with Angina.

      My advice would be to take it very slowly. Whether you will get back to heavy training or not is hard to say and to be perfectly honest irrelevant at the moment, I think your main goal should be to try to establish an exercise program that you can keep up without causing too much stress to your heart. Now this may take weeks, months or even years to perfect it’s very difficult to predict.

      As you have angina and are still getting pains in your neck I would consult your doctor and discuss with him your best way forward with regard to how much and what intensity of exercise you should be doing. Your last episode was not too long ago (3 months) so take it easy, slow and steady wins the race with something like this.

      Forget about what you did in the gym in the past and focus on how you are going to move forward in the future. Once you have suffered a cardiac event such as yours it becomes a game change and you really do need to readjust your lifestyle to suit your new circumstances. There will be many restrictions placed upon you from your doctor, your family and yourself. Your focus needs to be on establishing a balance so that you can keep exercising, live long and stay healthy in to the future.
      Hope this helps and good luck for the future.

      Reply
  • 06/02/2017 at 03:48
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    Hello,I check your blogs named “What is the Best Exercise Following A Stent | The Stent Blog” daily.Your humoristic style is awesome, keep it up! And you can look our website about proxy list.

    Reply
  • 06/03/2017 at 10:27
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    Hi,i had a stent placed in my urater . Can i go swimming in the pool?

    Reply
    • 08/03/2017 at 15:03
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      I would imagine you can but without knowing a little more I can’t say more. Stents are pretty much stents whether they are in your heart or your urethra (although don’t have any experience with urethral stents). So recovery will be pretty much the same. Probably best to have a word with you doctor just to make sure he’s okay with things.

      Reply
  • 06/16/2017 at 11:35
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    I had heart attach before one month 08.05.2017 and placed stent. Now im Fine doing yoga and walking .. some exercise also .. can I do exercise of hand chest means weight lift and all.

    Reply
    • 08/03/2017 at 14:58
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      Hi Ananad,

      Glad to see you are making progress. Yoga and walking are excellent forms of exercise. I do a yoga session almost every morning. If you are feeling ok with Yoga and walking I can’t see any reason why you can’t try other forms of exercise as long as they are in moderation. Start slowly, proceed slowly, listen to your body and If you feel any discomfort stop immediately and go see you doctor. Always speak to your doctor before starting any strenuous exercises and seek his advice just so he has a chance to reflect on your personal circumstances.
      Hope this helps keep up the good work.
      Dave

      Reply
  • 08/01/2017 at 10:16
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    Hi, my doctor sent me to hospital 3 weeks ago (pericarditis symptoms) I ended up having an unnecessary coronary angiogram – my house doctor was shocked to here this. In the process i got a catheter-induced RCA dissection which was luckly quickly treated with 2 stents. My question is, the doctors told me to rest 4-6 weeks then go back to work. I teach dance (which they know) 4-6 hrs a day including Zumba and streetdance courses. Will I be able to do this? Will I be resticted? I’m self employed and getting worried about my future.

    Reply
    • 08/03/2017 at 14:47
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      Hi Rachel

      The dissection will have caused some damage to your heart but over time this I think this will heal, hearts are very robust organs. The trick if there is one in you being able to assess your personal circumstances and how you feel following the procedure. Some people bounce back very quickly others it takes a little time and some it seems to take for ever.

      From what you have said prior to your hospitalization you were in pretty good shape (those Zumber and dance classes are pretty hard work) so from this, we can deduce that you had a pretty strong heart. Your heart just needs time to get over the insult it has received and the two stents that have been placed.

      Recovery is a very personal thing and only you can judge how you feel and whether what you are doing is distressing you too much. If the doctors have said 4-6 weeks generally that would be a good time scale to get back to some degree of normality for the average person. However, the average person does not hold Zumba and Streetdance classes for 4-6 hours per day. I’m pretty sure you doctor wouldn’t make it through one in fact. So, I think you will be able to go back to work but you really do have to listen to what your body is telling you and jumping straight into a full-on Zumba/Streetdance class may not be the best approach. As I’ve said many times slow and steady wins the race in the early stages post procedure. If you take your time it will pay dividends later on.

      Oh the one more thing, speak to your doctor and explain what exactly goes into a typical day at work for you just in case he/she wasn’t listening or is not aware and see if he has any advice or comment on how to progress. If he/she feels that you should go slowly (more slowly than you feel you should do) then I would heed his/her advice. Not sure where you live but in the UK, you can be referred through to Cardiac Rehabilitation Centres who help you to get back to a reasonable fitness level following your episode and before you return to work. Maybe that might be an option if the service is available.

      Hope this helps and hope you are back at your dancing soon.

      Dave

      Reply
  • 08/23/2017 at 14:39
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    My cardiologist refuses to take me off of the Plavix/aspirin combination even though it’s been over a year since I had my stent. His advice: just don’t get hurt. So, needless to say, I am worried about having to remain on these thinners and do anything that might cause bruising. Any suggestion?

    Reply
    • 08/23/2017 at 15:33
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      Hi Hank, thanks for getting in touch. It’s difficult to comment on individual cases when I don’t have the full picture. I can see why you want to get off the Plavix because of the issues with bleeding bruising etc as I would. In the UK the standard treatment post stent is aspirin (which is usually for life) unless there are other indications for using additional thinners (DATP). I did a bit of looking around and found this article http://news.heart.org/new-guidelines-say-blood-thinning-therapy-should-be-longer-for-some-shorter-for-others/ from the American Heart Association. The guidelines recommend tailoring treatment to the individual patient and goes on to say that some people will be on DATP for a longer period of time and others for a shorter period of time. There may be very good reasons why your cardiologist wants you to stay on Plavix. All I can suggest Hank is to speak to your cardiologist and ask him what his reasons are for keeping you on Plavix and explain to him your concerns with staying on thinners. Good luck for the future hope you get things sorted out.

      Reply
  • 10/02/2017 at 08:22
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    Hi,
    I had a stent put in about 1 month ago. Can I have laser treatment for tightening my tummy. It is non invasive.Thanks Jenny

    Reply
    • 10/02/2017 at 18:53
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      It’s not really my area of expertise Jenny i would speak to your doctor and discuss it with him/her. Can’t see a problem but its always best to check things out first.

      Cheers

      Dave

      Reply
  • 11/07/2017 at 19:55
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    First of all thank you for a great and interesting blog. Myself I have 4 stents 3 in the front artery and one in the back heart artery please don’t ask me the difficult names and terms of those arteries of the heart because I wouldn’t have clue unless I get all my medical paperwork out. I had my heart attack in May 2017 what really upsets me was an hour after the operation of the first three stents I went into cardiac arrest in front of my family as you can imagine this was a big shock for them as well as for me because I was joking and laughing with them just an hour after the operation hence I received a shock to get the heart back into rhythm pun included and of course I had CPR. Yes it was one big shock!💓😦 I will admit I was not very active before the heart attack always riding my mountain bike but not too great extremes or using it as a form of exercise as such.
    Anyway if you don’t mind, my question is this; I also suffer with extreme anxiety so doing anything is quite a burden especially after a cardiac arrest but I am determined to start exercising.
    Having a big local park near me how much walking I should do and for how long to start off with, I am 53 years old and I still feel fairly fit even though I guess in truth I’m not, I would really appreciate any advice .
    I could see the cardiac team to help me but due to my anxieties this has stopped me so far and I hope I can rid myself eventually of these anxieties and improve and be able to see the cardiac teams etc hopefully my anxieties will fade eventually. I am on various medication of course beta blockers 1.25 milligrams my heart rate at rest is usually between 42 and 58 depending on mood etc I guess . I would really appreciate any advice from anybody on how much walking how long for and the distance and if I should invest in a wrist heart monitoring device while I am walking and if so any advice or what type to buy which will not break the bank or my pocket. Thanks in advance.
    Kev.

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    • 11/13/2017 at 15:28
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      Hi Kev,
      Sorry, it’s taken me so long to get back to you.

      Glad to see your over what can only be described as a harrowing experience both for you and your family. It’s very lucky you were in a medical facility when it happened or the outcome could have been so much worse (thank god for defibs).

      Ok, let’s get down to brass tacks. This whole recovery thing is a very personal challenge that only you can meet. It all boils down to you being honest with yourself about what has happened and what you are prepared to do about it (you need to be comfortable with anything you decide).

      Your heart has suffered serious trauma both from the stent placements and from the cardiac arrest. The good thing is that our tickers are remarkably resilient organs and make amazing recoveries given time and a little help. Your heart like mine and many others suffers from heart disease which hopefully has been dealt with to some degree by the stent placements however you can’t just leave it at that as I’m sure you are aware. You really do need to look at lifestyle changes to compliment the invasive treatment you have already received.
      You’re on the right track with the exercise I would highly recommend trying to incorporate some type of exercise into your life. Your heart is a muscle just like your quads or your triceps and needs exercising. Now because of what you have been through it may be little delicate for a while so it’s really important that you take your time and go at your own pace. You mentioned suffering from anxiety and here you need to try to strike a balance. If you decide to say go for a long run but this makes you so anxious that you are unable to complete it or it’s so unpleasant that it makes you ill then it will be a totally counterproductive and possible cause your condition to worsen. On the other hand, doing nothing is not an option either So, realise that you’re in for the long haul (the rest of your life) and set your agenda accordingly.

      Not sure where you up to with exercise but here are a couple of suggestions:

      Walking is great and it doesn’t have to be fast and hard or excessively long. In the early days do what you can manage. Popping out for fresh air, going to the local shops, walking in the garden if you have one. Keep it very low key and walk with someone whenever you can. When I was a paramedic the guy next door had a heart attack. I went in to see if he was okay and we called for an ambulance to take him to hospital. Following his treatment in hospital, he came home and I went around to see him. He had been advised to change his lifestyle and take more exercise. He was doing great with his diet etc but not so good with the exercise. We had a chat and it turned out that he was afraid to go out for walks because he was scared in case something happened when he was out on his own. Simple, I said we will go out walking together which we did. After about a month he felt much more comfortable about walking and then walked on his own.

      The point I am trying to make is that you need to set it up to win. My neighbour was scared on his own but not with someone (me). When he went out on his own he always had a phone with him. He always told his wife where he was going and how long it would take. He took his time with the exercise and didn’t rush it. You need to find things so you’re in control. Plug into that Cardiac Team to see what they can offer you they are a fantastic source of information and guidance. See if your doctor has any further advice. Like I said, set it up to win!!

      The amount of exercise is difficult as it really depends on how you respond to the exercise you are doing. The only advice I can give here is to go slow, build it up incrementally and listen to your body. If it doesn’t feel right or you start to feel any chest pain stop ASAP and go get it checked out. If there is a secret it’s not the amount of exercise you do its consistency. That big local park near you looks like a great place to explore.

      Once you have nailed the walking and are looking at taking up a more challenging type of exercise spend some time figuring out what you really like doing exercise wise. Find something you have a passion for because you’re going to be doing this for the rest of your life and passion will see you through. I do yoga every morning which I find very relaxing. At first, I went to some yoga lessons then I created my own 20-minute yoga routine (from videos on YouTube) which I do almost every morning, it’s not too strenuous it keeps me flexible and gets my head ready for the day. Go explore there is lots of stuff to do out there but go steady.

      The Psychological effects can be debilitating. You can worry yourself in to inactivity if you’re not careful. Doing exercise with people will certainly help as I mentioned above. If the anxiety is really bad I would seek professional help if you can.

      There are all sorts of different fitness monitors/activity trackers you can buy. I have a Garmin fitness watch which I find very useful. I also had Fitbit which was pretty good as well. You can pick a decent activity tracker up for a hundred dollars.

      Like I said Kev sorry it took so long to get back to you hope this helps! Good luck with your recovery hope you are back to full fitness and full health as soon as possible. Let us know how you get on!

      Best wishes for the future
      Cheers
      Dave

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